Category Access to Treatment

Minority Mental Health 5-Year Review: Is There Progress?

Susan Weinstein
Editor in Chief, Care for Your Mind

Five years ago, writing about National Minority Mental Health Month, we noted that the Affordable Care Act (ACA) marked a time of progress on issues of health disparities because it expanded access to health insurance. The more people with health insurance, we figured, the better the likelihood of their being diagnosed and treated. At that time – with the first ACA enrollment period still three months away – we were also hopeful because mental health care was one of the 10 Essential Health Benefits required of insurance plans under the ACA...

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…And One Guy Says to the Other…

Caroline Eretzen

Caroline Erentzen
PhD Candidate, York University

Last week, Caroline Erentzen discussed her research into the use of humor in mental health awareness campaigns and how tapping into men’s so-called feminine traits reduces their defensiveness. This week, we look at how we might use this information to help more men get care.

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Two Guys Walk Into a Therapist’s Office…

Caroline Eretzen

Caroline Erentzen
PhD Candidate, York University

Men have higher rates of dying by suicide, alcohol consumption, illegal drug use, and substance dependence than women, but seek help for mental health concerns less often. A recent study found that using humor can encourage men to seek help by appealing to … their femininity.

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Mom and daughter with doctor

By Care for Your Mind, based on material from the
National Association of Social Workers

March has been National Social Work Month, prompting us to look at the vital role of social workers in improving our health and society.

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Stigma – and Other Factors – Affect Blacks’ Use of Mental Health Services

Doctor

Susan Weinstein, Editor in Chief
Care for Your Mind

Black History Month provides an opportunity to consider the lives of African-Americans and other Black people in the U.S. At Care for Your Mind, every week we look at issues of quality of and access to mental health care. That leads us to approaching Black History Month with the objective of recognizing barriers to care today, understanding why they exist, and seeking answers to the question of what can be done to improve both the quality of and access to mental health care.

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Defining Value in Treatment of Mental Health and Co-Occurring Conditions

Allen Doederlein, Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance

Among people who advocate for any health issue, there often exists a dynamic tension between championship of the perfect treatment scenario for each individual with a particular condition and, on the other hand, the desire to meet the most important and frequently occurring needs of as many people as possible within the total population affected by the same condition.

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Tardive Dyskinesia: A Clinician’s Perspective

Christoph U. Correll

Christoph U. Correll, MD
Professor of Psychiatry and Molecular Medicine
Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, Hempstead, NY

Being human is defined by many things. One important definition is the degree of freedom in experiencing and expressing oneself in areas that determine our life. These fundamental aspects include perceiving, feeling, thinking, and behaving. Just as critical are our muscles and motor system, which enable us to respond to and explore the world. Being in control of our fingers, arms, legs, trunk, and especially our facial muscles is crucial. It allows us to effectively communicate with the world and people around us. But what if, in addition to living with a mental health condition, we also had to navigate the world with a lack of motor skills. For many this is reality.

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Tardive Dyskinesia: A Personal Story About Self-Advocacy

Cariena Birchard

I was diagnosed with Bipolar I, Anxiety with Panic Attacks, and Agoraphobia in 1994. I have a long history of medications working for a year or so, then suddenly stop working. Because of this, I have been on a laundry list of medications over the last twenty-three years. I have experienced my fair share of obscure side effects that were so strange in the moment, but are sometimes a means to an end if the result is psychiatric calm. I have been on medications that caused weight gain, insomnia, excessive sleepiness, lactation, nausea, restless legs, and migraines.

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