Category Access to Treatment

Five Myths that Prevent Men from Fighting Depression

Joshua R. Beharry

Joshua R. Beharry, Project Coordinator, HeadsUpGuys

Depression is a difficult topic for many men to discuss, yet it’s one we need to talk about during this year’s Men’s Health Week (June 12th-18th).

Unfortunately phrases like “be strong,” “don’t cry,” “suck it up,” and “be a man” shape how young men think about their emotions and health, and discourage them from talking to others when things might not be going so well.

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Psychiatric Advance Directives: A Must-Have for Us

Families for Depression Awareness

For people living with mental health conditions, advance planning is a “must-do.” When our conditions render us unable to make measured decisions as we would at times when we are not in distress, having delusions, or otherwise not functioning as our usual selves, we want to know that we have made our wishes known, that our family members and support network know what to expect and what are their roles, and that our care team is ready, willing, and able to do as we have specified.

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WHO World Health Day. Depression: Let’s Talk

Alyson Lofthouse
Senior Associate Director, Global Health Program, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago

World Health Day on April 7 focuses on depression. Alyson Lofthouse makes the case for bringing depression to the forefront in addressing overall health and among refugees and immigrants.

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Faster and Easier Approaches for Improving Patients’ Depression Treatment Outcomes

Michael E. Thase, M.D.

Michael E. Thase, M.D.
Professor of Psychiatry
Director, Mood and Anxiety Disorders Treatment and Research Program
University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine

Care For Your Mind acknowledges and appreciates the collaboration of the National Network of Depression Centers for developing this post.

Depression affects more than 15 million Americans and it’s the leading underlying factor for people who attempt suicide. Only half of Americans diagnosed with major depression receive treatment. Because earlier diagnosis and treatment improve outcomes, mental health screenings should be a top priority.

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Think You Have Adequate Insurance Coverage? Think Again.

Carol Rickard
Chair, DBSA New Jersey Grassroots Organization

Every year, millions of people go through their employer’s open enrollment period for health care insurance and are completely unaware of the danger that lies lurking in the darkness of that coverage: managed care!

As I sit to write this article, I am reminded of my introduction to managed care via a patient I cared for on the inpatient mental health unit where I had worked as a Recreation Therapist. Honestly, she comes to mind any time my thoughts move to “managed care.”

An all too common story
Linda was a mother of two young ...

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Illinois Advocates Unite to Tackle High Costs of Treatments

Naoki Nakamura
Chair, DBSA IL Grassroots Organization

Karen was finalizing the dissolution of an 18-year marriage while managing increasing expectations at her demanding job. In order to cope with depression coupled with her Premenstrual Dysmorphic Disorder (PMDD), her psychiatrist prescribed a medication that is unavailable in generic form. As a result, Karen’s monthly prescription cost was well over $100, on an insurance plan that had a $2,000 deductible.

Karen was overwhelmed: “I felt I had to keep working and making more money just to pay for my medication. It was a vicious circle.”

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Time to Stop Punishing the Chronically Ill: Why I Support Capping Out-of-Pocket Drug Costs

Care for Your Mind kicks off a new series on state-level issues of access to quality mental health care. This post focuses on activities in just one state, but advocacy around this topic is happening across the country.

Representative Laura Fine (Illinois 17th District)

I am a proud co-sponsor of legislation (IL HB 3605) that seeks to shield patients and their families from the exorbitant out-of-pocket drug co-payments increasingly being imposed by health insurers...

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What to Do When You Can’t Afford Therapy

Kimberly Morrow, LCSW

Practical advice for obtaining quality mental healthcare when money is tight

Thanks to mental health parity, many more people have access to psychotherapy than in the past. But two great barriers to treatment remain. The first is shame, as the stigma of mental illness still prevents many from seeking professional help. The second is cost, because even when people have health insurance, the expense of co-pays and high deductibles can be too much when money is tight.

For some people, the predicament of needing mental health treatment, but not being able to afford it is doubly shameful, and so they never seek the care they need.

But I’m here to tell you there are ways to obtain high-quality therapy for little or no cost, and people should never let shame get in the way of wellness. Here are some tips for talking to mental health providers about cost concerns, as well as suggestions for ways you can get free or discounted care.

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