Medicaid tagged posts

Hundreds of Mental Health Advocates from All 50 States Converge on Capitol Hill

Last week, more than 700 advocates from around the country descended on Washington, D.C., to educate lawmakers about the need for improved policies and funding around mental health care. Now in its thirteenth year, the National Council for Behavioral Health Hill Day brought together participants from 20 different mental health advocacy organizations including your Care for Your Mind principals, the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA)—a partner for the past seven years—and Families for Depression Awareness.

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Can Medicaid Managed Care Programs Deliver on the Promise to Improve Outcomes?

Heather O’Donnell
Vice President of Advocacy and Public Policy, Thresholds

Autumn ushers in a time to evaluate your current health insurance plans. Over the next few weeks, CFYM will provide information on Medicaid, employee-sponsored plans, and ACA marketplace plans. In today’s post, Heather O’Donnell provides guidance about moving to a Medicaid managed care plan.

As the Affordable Care Act is implemented across the country, Illinois, like most states, is making changes to its Medicaid program. As the largest insurer of Illini living with a mental health condition, this program has a responsibility to

  • improve health outcomes
  • reduce preventable hospitalizations
  • reduce costs.

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Louisiana is a National Leader with their “Prescriber Prevails” Medicaid Policy

BenNeversBen Nevers
State Senator Louisiana

For the past three weeks we’ve devoted this blog to raising awareness around a proposed regulation by the CMS to restrict access to mental health care. But did you know that individual states have fail first policies as well, through the implementation of their Medicaid programs? Read today’s post to learn if your state is on the list.

Louisiana is a National Leader with their “Prescriber Prevails” Medicaid Policy
Keeps access to medication in the hands of physicians and patients

There are many reasons why people do not receive adequate mental health treatment, each of those reasons is as unique and as highly personalized as the individuals themselves. Yet, nearly all stem from the fundamental problem of access. Access to timely, appropriate, affordable mental health care is too often limited and restricted as a result of the following:

  • a shortage of providers or inpatient beds in a given community
  • insurer restrictions on what, when and how providers can prescribe medication and treatment
  • cost barriers that put mental health care financially out of reach

When such barriers obstruct access to care, more people are at risk for serious, disabling mental illness; and in those cases, society bears the related costs. For that reason, I believe we must work together to address these barriers and expand access to mental health services. The cost of not doing so is enormous.

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