SAMHSA tagged posts

As Extreme Weather Events Increase, So Do Mental Health Needs. How Is the Federal Government Dealing with It?

Susan Weinstein, Families for Depression Awareness

Hurricane. Flood. Drought. Tornado.

Search for any of these weather conditions on the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) website and you’ll see that these natural disasters have mental health ramifications.

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Hundreds of Mental Health Advocates from All 50 States Converge on Capitol Hill

Last week, more than 700 advocates from around the country descended on Washington, D.C., to educate lawmakers about the need for improved policies and funding around mental health care. Now in its thirteenth year, the National Council for Behavioral Health Hill Day brought together participants from 20 different mental health advocacy organizations including your Care for Your Mind principals, the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA)—a partner for the past seven years—and Families for Depression Awareness.

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SAMHSA and Partners Address the Increasing Urgency of Suicide Prevention

Throughout September 2017, in conjunction with National Suicide Prevention Month, our CFYM posts dealt with various aspects of suicide prevention: the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention’s 2012 National Strategy for Suicide Prevention (NSSP); the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention’s policy agenda related to suicide prevention at both the federal and state levels; a suicide attempt survivor’s personal experience of sharing her own story to help both those struggling with suicidal ideation and peers at elevated risk for suicidal ideation and attempts; and efforts directed at young people, primarily in academic settings.

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What’s standing in the way of mental health recovery?

Paolo del Vecchio, M.S.W.
Director, Center for Mental Health Services
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

Yesterday, Paolo del Vecchio told his personal recovery story and shared a set of elements that help define recovery. Today, he puts recovery into perspective with health reform.

Opportunities for Recovery under the ACAdelvecchio

To recover, individuals need access to quality, affordable health care and mental health services. The Affordable Care Act (ACA) expands mental health and substance use disorder benefits and parity protections to an estimated 62 million Americans and heralds a new era of hope for people with mental illnesses.

Beginning January 1, 2014, millions of uninsured Americans with mental health and substance use conditions will have access to health insurance coverage, many for the first time. In addition, thanks to the new health care law, beginning in 2014, insurers will no longer be able to deny anyone coverage because of a pre-existing mental health condition. Individuals will be able to sign up and enroll for insurance beginning in October of this year. People should go to www.healthcare.gov to find info on how to enroll.

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Defining Recovery: From Mental Health Consumer to Policymaker

Paolo del Vecchio, M.S.W.
Director, Center for Mental Health Services
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

delvecchioWe recover in community. In community, we share stories and spread hope. And in community, we raise our voices so all may have the opportunity for recovery.

For more than 40 years, I have been involved in behavioral health as a consumer, family member, provider, advocate, and now policymaker.

The thread throughout my journey has been opportunity and hope. Over the years, I’ve learned that it is community that provides opportunity, and it is in community that we find hope.

I am pleased to participate in this forum to share stories of recovery and spread the message that recovery is not only possible, it is the expected outcome of services, supports, and treatment. Together, through our shared experiences and with our collective voice, we can change the conversation on mental health and increase awareness of the possibility of recovery.

My Recovery Story

My own story is deeply rooted in the healing power of community. I experienced mental illness early in my childhood.

As a child, I experienced trauma by witnessing domestic violence and alcoholism in the family. As a result, I became withdrawn, depressed and anxious. And, I was alone.

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