tardive dyskinesia tagged posts

Tardive Dyskinesia: A Clinician’s Perspective

Christoph U. Correll

Christoph U. Correll, MD
Professor of Psychiatry and Molecular Medicine
Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, Hempstead, NY

Being human is defined by many things. One important definition is the degree of freedom in experiencing and expressing oneself in areas that determine our life. These fundamental aspects include perceiving, feeling, thinking, and behaving. Just as critical are our muscles and motor system, which enable us to respond to and explore the world. Being in control of our fingers, arms, legs, trunk, and especially our facial muscles is crucial. It allows us to effectively communicate with the world and people around us. But what if, in addition to living with a mental health condition, we also had to navigate the world with a lack of motor skills. For many this is reality.

Read More

Tardive Dyskinesia: A Personal Story About Self-Advocacy

Cariena Birchard

I was diagnosed with Bipolar I, Anxiety with Panic Attacks, and Agoraphobia in 1994. I have a long history of medications working for a year or so, then suddenly stop working. Because of this, I have been on a laundry list of medications over the last twenty-three years. I have experienced my fair share of obscure side effects that were so strange in the moment, but are sometimes a means to an end if the result is psychiatric calm. I have been on medications that caused weight gain, insomnia, excessive sleepiness, lactation, nausea, restless legs, and migraines.

Read More