What do Farmers, Construction Workers, and Police Officers Have in Common?

construction workers

Families for Depression Awareness

Unfortunately, higher rates of suicide than many other occupations. Workplace mental health programs can help.

Read More

Business Two-for-One. Supporting the Mental Health of Employees Improves Profits.

Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance

For employers seeking to reduce the financial and human costs of mental health issues, there’s no need to reinvent the wheel.

Read More

Should Providers Ask, “How’s Your Financial Health?”

Ken Dolan-Del Vecchio

Ken Dolan-Del Vecchio
Vice President, Health and Wellness, Prudential

Money may not be the root of all evil but it can be the root of a lot of problems, including mental health problems. But for clinicians, talking about it is taboo.

Read More

Know Your Workplace Rights. Put Protections in Place Before They Are Needed

Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance

Repeal of the Affordable Care Act will cause every state to lose jobs, says Josh Bivens. How can you be successful at work and protect your job when you live with a mood disorder?

Read More

Medicaid Update: Can We Anticipate Changes in Eligibility and Benefits?

Amber Kirchhoff

Almost half of the people in the United States under the age of 65 who receive Medicaid benefits because of a disability access care for mental health conditions or substance use disorders. Among this population, 18 percent had experienced a mood disorder episode in the past year. Congress and the Trump Administration are focused on changing the structure of these benefits and other ways in which Americans access affordable healthcare. During this time of transition, CFYM will keep you updated on potential and actual healthcare policy changes and share personal stories illustrating how these changes may affect our ability to access care. (If you are concerned about changes to healthcare or if you have an experience to share with the CFYM community, you can submit your story, too!)

Amber Kirchhoff, Policy Associate
Thresholds

As a community-based provider serving nearly 15,000 clients annually, Thresholds recognizes the Affordable Care Act (“ACA” or “Obamacare”) as a major step forward in increasing access to treatment for individuals with mental health and substance use conditions. Intertwined with the near-certain repeal of the ACA are proposals for changing Medicaid. This is an important part of the conversation because many people with mental health and substance use conditions access care through Medicaid.

Read More

Turning Our Eyes Back to the Brain

Doug Williamson

Doug Williamson, M.D.
Chief Medical Officer & Vice President for Lundbeck U.S. Drug Development

Care for Your Mind acknowledges and appreciates the collaboration of the American Brain Coalition in developing this series.

An epidemic
The world’s quietest healthcare crisis is one that starts between the ears.

When it comes to mental illness, the statistics are nearly too staggering to process. For instance, today, depression alone costs Americans an estimated $210 billion dollars each year, as millions of patients across the country struggle with a range of disabling symptoms – from loss of energy to insomnia to poor concentration – as well as massive lost productivity in the classroom, in the workforce, and on the home front. Meanwhile, while we are making such incredible strides in our treatment of cancer, Hepatitis C, HIV, and many other diseases, the tragedy and expense of mental illness accumulates by the day. According to the World Health Organization, by 2030, depression will be the leading global burden of disease.

Read More

The Future for Depression Is Bright, But We Have to Be Patient

William Z. Potter

William Z. Potter, M.D., Ph.D., Foundation for the National Institutes of Health

Care for Your Mind acknowledges and appreciates the collaboration of the American Brain Coalition and the National Network of Depression Centers in developing this series.

Despite the hurdles that stand in the way of developing new treatments for depression and other mood disorders, I believe we have every reason to be optimistic.

When it comes to science, time is on our side, and the landscape for drug development will look much, much different in 10 to 20 years when we have a better understanding of the brain. But in the meantime, we need to find ways to help the millions of people who are suffering now.

Read More

To Heal Depression, We Have to Learn More About the Brain

William Z. Potter

William Z. Potter, M.D., Ph.D., National Institutes of Health

Care for Your Mind acknowledges and appreciates the collaboration of the American Brain Coalition and the National Network of Depression Centers in developing this series.

With 350 million people worldwide suffering from depression and diagnoses rising steadily since the 1980s, you’d hope scientists would have a thorough understanding of this pervasive condition. Needless to say, we don’t. Not even close.

Despite decades of study, we’re just starting to scratch the surface when it comes to understanding the brain. Its complexity has proved a huge hurdle when it comes to developing effective new treatments for the millions of people dealing with depression.

Read More