Category Young Adults

The Mental Health Tragedy in the US:
What Can Be Done?

Victor Schwartz, MD, Medical Director, The Jed Foundation

In an October 2015 segment of HBO’s Last Week Tonight, John Oliver did a stunningly effective report on the tragic state of mental health services and care in the US. While it seems we only talk about mental health care as a national policy issue after mass shootings – which, as Oliver pointed out, is exactly the wrong time and context for this discussion – we have a national tragedy around mental health care.  Given that we only recently commemorated World Mental Health Day, it behooves us to take a few moments to consider the problem and what we might do about it, apart from the debate around gun violence and mental health.

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It Takes a Campus

How colleges and universities can better support students with behavioral health issues

Nance Roy, Ed.D.
Clinical Director, The Jed Foundation

The need for campus-based support for students with behavioral health conditions is clear. According to NAMI, nearly 73 percent of students living with a mental health condition experienced a mental health crisis on campus. Yet, 35 percent of those students reported that their college did not know about their crisis. Overall, 40 percent of students with diagnosable mental health conditions did not seek help.

Colleges can best meet students’ needs by enhancing institutional awareness and response to students who are struggling. While most colleges and universities have behavioral health services to support students, often not everyone on campus is aware of the resources. Even the best of programs and services can’t be effective if they remain largely unknown and not well utilized.

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I Needed Services and Support; My Parents and Schools Came Through

By Elizabeth

I started to suffer from anxiety and depression when I was in 7th grade, but by the time I got to high school, things were getting out of control. When I started going to see the adjustment counselor every, or every other class period to get support in managing my bad thoughts and anxiety, the school contacted my parents in order to get me help.

Things got hard and I was hospitalized but I did return to school. My parents worked with the school to put an educational accommodation plan in place. It wasn’t long, though, until the school had to act again. Because I was self-injuring and had unsafe thoughts, the school was concerned about my safety.

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So Now What? Mental Health and Making the Transition from High School to College

Jazmin Kay

Jazmin Kay
Mental Health Advocate, JED Foundation
Student, George Washington University

Like many students, I have dreamed about this week for years.

Packing up my car to the brim, wrapping up my childhood experiences into a scrappy cardboard box. Feeling a mixture of ecstasy and sadness as I smoosh the imprint of my face into the backseat window, I say goodbye to my hometown, and proceed to the next chapter of my life. But leaving for freshman year of college—contrary to what my movie-convinced middle school self believed—is not that “picture perfect.”

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